Writings end and ferments for sale at Northside Produce Market in North Sydney

These are the pages proofs of my very recently completed manuscript, for publication by Murdoch Books this September in Australia and October in the UK. Writing or rather the endless editing process, is at an end and it is now far away in China being printed. I could not be happier with what you can not yet see and I so hope you will be too. The images shot by the very talented Ben Dearnley are fabulous. It is packed with all you need to know; for successfully capturing and employing a wide range of the worlds ever present preservationist microbes. It is my wish that it inspire, inform and delight you all and that it travels the globe in search of homes where fermented foods may be enjoyed and perform their valuable work.

Since I am no longer consumed by writing I have joined the ranks of market stall holders at The Northside Produce Markets, in North Sydney. Click here for the Upcoming dates, at which my products can be found for sale. Yolande Gray is selling for me on June 3rd and 17th beside her Dishrag Linen stall while I visit my family in London. I will be back to sell there in person the third Saturday of the month from July 15th; on my return from the UK.  I have made a range of hand cut, wild fermented condiments including krauts and pickles to delight and excite your taste buds and make your digestion sing. I recommend you get in quick if a good Indian lime pickle is of interest. The recipes for most of the products for sale, including that one will be found in my book Ferment- A guide to the ancient art of culurting foods, when it is released this September. Be sure to pick up an  invitation to the launch at the market, more on that in future posts.

Here are 4 useful things to know, when giving a home to fermented foods.

1. When a ferment is culturing in the first few weeks it is a good idea to stand it on a plate to catch any possible leakage.

2. Bringing a ferment to warm room temperature is likely to restart fermentation and the product may appear to boil. Open the jar to release any excess gases and then close tightly and store in the fridge where fermentation will slow right down, with no harm done.

3. When using your fermented foods be sure to push what remains in the jar down, to keep it submerged in its own liquid, to protect it from potential spoilers and keep the jar above the product clean for the same reason.

4. A little white mould will do no harm and can easily be scooped away so you can consume the remainder but if you find a bright mould on the mix this means you need to discard the lot.

 

Follow this link for recipes I have written for Liveability.com.au

 

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Choosing fish by price, likely means, choosing what is plentiful,  local and a more sustainable option. This makes delicious, nutritious eating, guilt free.

It is getting harder and harder to feel good about eating much at all and fish eating is rife with concerns. Here are a few simple guides for choosing the freshest fish, to feel happy about eating. When it comes to wholefoods, one of the most oft heard comments I hear is, ‘it costs so much more to eat well’ well it can and perhaps it ought but that is a topic for another day. I made eating well a priority so long ago that it is now second nature for me to buy produce at prices way over the norm. I don’t do so to show off, I do so to put my money where my mouth is and prioritise, for the sake of our future, believing that animal husbandry, ocean management and soil care are vital issues.  I pay more for just about everything but not for fish. When I shop for fish I look for the freshest, locally, wild caught and cheapest options. Small fish are generally plentiful, lower on the food chain and as a result carry less toxic load. Small oily fish like these Yellow Tail, Anchovies, Sardines Mackerel and more offer  greater amounts of beneficial omega 3 oils, they are quick cooking, suited cooking with stronger flavours and are absolutely delicious. For one of my favourite ways to cook these species, see my recipe on Liveability.com.au you will find a new recipe of mine here each month and so much more about living a more sustainable life at home. My most recent Autumn recipe is also well worth a look, especially if you wonder how to cook Golden nugget pumpkins with millet and chestnuts for optimum deliciousness. To find more recipes follow the link on the home page click the Guide, Recipes,DIY tab. Cecille’s blog is an eclectic offering, she describes liveability this way, ‘It’s when health, efficiency, comfort and connection to community come together to create a more liveable home.’

 

 

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River Cottage Spring Food Fair and a Week ‘Exploring the Microcosmos- New Paradigms from Microbial Communities’ at Schumacher College

Sandor Katz in Brisbane with my Mango young country wine

The River Cottage Food fair and Sandor Ellix Katz. Sandor,  Eva Bakkeslett, ecologist and scientist Phillip Frans and Steven Harding. Exploring the microcosmos takes place at Scumacher College in the Transition town of Totnes. Above is a photo of Sandor in Brisbane holding my Mango young country wine, a heady brew, unlike my usual range of lacto ferments. He was on the Milkwood Permaculture Sandor Katz Australian Tour, earlier this year. I was fortunate to make many of the samples required for the Sydney leg. The tour was a resounding success and provided a massive injection of fermentation revival for Australia’s East coast.

By my great good fortune and rather a lot of cooking I find myself back in the UK and off to attend these exciting events. It is springtime and rather beautiful here. The sun and rain combine to make green unlike anything we see in Sydney. Returning to the land I grew up in for the first time since my mothers death last year, is bitter sweet and heart opening. Again I experience the nostalgia of youth and the longing for the place I have come to know as home. I expect any  dual citizen will relate. It is delightful to be back and working for the wonderful folk who took me in last year. I have completed another course of evening classes in Notting Hill, I have returned to work with Elisabeth who has happily transformed from her unwell state to radiance. Nothing gives me greater pleasure than seeing what love, friendship and dedication to holistic healing, can do to the state of a human being in crisis. I am returned too, to the most exquisite home in Chelsea where I am cooking twice a week.

 

IMG_2877_2I will be catering and teaching in the UK in July. July 9th I will be teaching a ‘Capturing Cultures’ hands on class at Rochelle Canteen  in Arnold Circus E2. This is an excellent place to eat delicious unfussy food made from the best Britain has to offer. Margo Henderson and Mel Arnold Arnold and Henderson catering company too. If you are in need of an exciting event catered, these are your folk. I predict this to be an extremely fun evening with a delicious supper to follow the chopping and jarring of Kim Chi.

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This was me catering Lizzie and Marks divine wedding in February on Pittwater. 18kilos of prime Glenburnie Black Angus, free range, grass fed and grass finished beef, supplied by  Grant and Laura of Feather and Bone, purveyors of truly sustainable meat. It was a pleasure to cook and by the comments and guests returning for third, a pleasure to eat too! I roasted it at 70˚C for 7 hours and here I am finishing it off on the air conditioned barbecue.

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Winter, the season for inner reflection, drawing in and foods that warm to the core

Deep Water, Iford NSW ©Sarah Ducker 2012

This photo is the perfect representation of the winter months, dark, cold and mysterious. A time for bringing warmth to the core of our body to help us manage the colder weather. Any northern hemisphere reader might scoff, thinking that Australia never gets that cold. It is all relative and the 17˚C in my room today see’s me bundled up beside the heater!

I made Oden yesterday, Japan’s answer to winter warming nourishment; eaten on the icy winter streets and in bars. For those who have a copy, there is a recipe for this fabulous dish, in my cookbook Nourish. It is a very simple broth with these ingredients at least, mirin and tamari, kombu, shiitake mushrooms, daikon, carrots and tofu; all long slow simmered into a deeply delicious meal. This broth looks somewhat like the photo above, unfathomable, watery and dark.

In Chinese 5 element theory winter is a representation of the water element, dark red and black, saltiness and it is the season that requires we give attention to our water organs, the kidneys and the bladder. Cooking styles that best suit the season include long slow simmering, braising roasting sauteeing and preserving. It’s a great time for the slow cooker, the stock pot and the oven but dont forget, and I suspect you wont, we all love something sweet to eat and winter provides us some fabulous fruits. The quince above were transformed from rock hard yellow to meltingly soft, deep red sweetness by long slow simmering with only a very small amount of maple syrup. They were dense and toothsome. Top tip… just cut them in half and wait to core them after they have cooked. This makes it very easy to extract the hard core without leaving any behind and it saves the risk of a knife wound.

The recipe for these is included in my  Refresh, Restore & Nourish in Winter  4 evening or 4 day course. The course provides the fundamental skills of cooking in this season with many supportive easy winter recipes and a menu plan that offers a broad range of breakfasts, lunches dinners and snacks. I ran this course in Rozelle a couple of weeks ago and got the following fabulous feedback.

Zoe said… Thanks for a great 4 days of cooking, eating and learning. I’m just about to qualify as a Naturopath and found 4 days with you to be more valuable and useable than all the nutrition classes I’ve done! You make it real- let food be our medicine, and medicine be our food.

Gabriella offered this…”Thank you again for such a wonderful four days of learning, cooking and discussions. You left me wishing I could bring you home and tuck you away in my kitchen. The amount of knowledge you have on eating nourishing, seasonal foods and healing with whole foods is incredible and I only wished we could have had more time.

Jo wrote…  You are a warm, generous soul who was exceptionally patient, passionate and professional.  I have a coeliac husband and dairy intolerant preschooler, I have beendesperate for inspiration and ideas on how to cook easy meals that cater for everyone’s needs.  I sought information and inspiration and came away with bucket (or shall I say, jar) loads!  I felt so relaxed and happy and really nourished myself.  I think I ate better in 4 days with you than I have in months!  Your food was delicious and made me see how I can make some tasty gf and df meals.

I am running this course again, over 4 Tuesday evenings starting tomorrow, Tuesday 12th June, in Bilgola. There are a few places for the quick and keen. Send me an email asap if you want a spot. I will be running it in Melbourne at The Green Grocer in Fitzroy North, at the end of July. Please help me spread the news to Victoria. More details of this and this months Capturing Cultures classes and more can be found here

cacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacacaca These crab apples, opportunistically gathered after a catering job in Bowral, were way too sour to be edible when picked but with a slow simmer, the addition of a little spice and sweetness they have become deep red ‘roadside crab apple jelly’ which will last the winter long and beyond, though I have gifted half of it to friends already!

Here’s what I did, so you can too. There is something deeply satisfying about producing food from ‘found’ ingredients.

Recipe for roadside crab apple jelly

3 kilos fruit, washed but otherwise untouched, tipped into a large stew pan

covered in cold water and brought to a gentle simmer, pop in a split vanilla bean and a couple of cinnamon quills

simmered until the apples soften, about 30-40 minutes

the fruit and liquid are poured into a colander lined with two or three layers of muslin, over a large pot. Don’t press the fruit, allow it to strain overnight

Measure the juice and add the pulp to the compost

use 500gms light muscovado sugar or raw sugar per litre

simmer the juice and sugar until the temperature reaches 105˚C at this point it will gel beautifully

contain in sterile glass jars, cool and pour a layer of liquid bees wax over the jelly to seal, lid and store until you are ready to use- i’ll give you 3 hours max…

Something new. Exploring Winter Wellness Workshop. Yoga by Gwynne Jone, food by Holly Davis

On July 15 I am teaming up with yogi Gwynne Jones, we are  offering a seasonal one day winter workshop at The Intuitive Well in Bondi Junction. For all the details see June-September classes page

Where I have been, a request and an offer; to celebrate the tawny colour, sweet flavour, crisp air and round ground fruits of Autumn


A month ago family needs sent me rushing back to London. As a result I had to postpone the March 29 Capturing Cultures class. My thanks to those of you that had booked and paid for this class for your understanding and flexibility. New dates are online now, see the May-September tab and let me know which dates suit you best.

In London I was met by blue skies, crisp air and warm loving arms. Twenty eight years in Australia, with most trips back over Christmas, caused me to forget the thrill of Springtime in the Uk. I was surprised and delighted by the effect a little sunshine has on the British public, while I layered up with cashmere, scarves, a borrowed coat and boots, London folk stripped off and got about in summer frocks and sandles and the news was of trips to the beach to enjoy the heatwave of 20˚C! I squeezed in a few fine foody experiences, the quality of food in England has changed, so much for the better. Good food, real food is on offer all over the country. Artisan producers abound and I was thrilled by some fantastic produce. I went to this fantastic winebar under the railway arches in Maltby Street, Bermondsey in London’s east end, this is a neighbourhood to visit and watch for fab food and excellent ales.

I also visited The Welbeck School Of Artisan Food on The Welbeck Estate in Nottinghamshire this is an extraordinarily well set up cooking school where traditional baking, cheese making and butchery are taught. I went to suggest that they might like to have me visit next year, as a guest, to teach the art of lacto fermented foods and drinks. There are also small producers on the estate making Stichelton cheese, this is similar to Stilton which comes from this area of England but Stilton is no longer produced from raw milk, Stichelton is and I can tell you it is damn fine cheese. The Welbeck brewery produces a small range of excellent ales too which are sold locally.

Now I am returned to the delights of Pittwater in Autumn, my favourite season here, where skies are brilliant blue, the water is crystaline and it seems to me now, as I gaze at the beach and many eucalypts, that everything has been outlined with a 4B pencil.

Growing Healthy Children Seminar was opened by a potent totem to remind us all how exciting life can be!

The Growing Healthy Children Seminar was declared a huge success. Over a hundred participants came to hear Dr Rosalba Courtney, Jude Blereau and me speak at Glenaeon Rudolf Steiner School. It proved to be an excellent venue, albeit that the wildlife moved in on the action as we were about to get started. A beautiful green tree snake wound its way into a camera bag at the front of the room and after I asked everyone to move away, it was resptfully returned to the bush.

During the afternoon Dr Rosalba Courtney from Breath and Body Osteopathic and Natural Health Clinic discussed the fundamentals of growing a healthy child, including the difference it makes for children to have a secure parental bond, attention paid to correct breathing patterns, the immense and theraputic effect of time spent in nature and much more. Jude Blereau from Wholefood Cooking covered what, how and when to feed children, with food that will heal nourish and delight them and I expounded on the virtues of lacto fermented foods, what they are, how to include them and ‘hide’ them, some of the variations on the theme available to us and of course, I encouraged everyone to come to one of my in depth classes, to learn how to easily and safely make their own range of fermented foods. Check out latest programme on the Classes May to September page.


For those who prefer to purchase these therapeutic vitals, we had Dominic Angelucci there, to sell his just launched ‘Life In a Jar’ Organic cultured vegetables. These were offered as part of our afternoon tea and soon sold out after that. Keep an eye out for them, Feather and Bone are a stockist.

Honest to Goodness provided us with fabulous helpers and offered some of their most relevant dry goods for sale. Our heartfelt thanks To Karen and Matt for their ongoing efforts in supplying Sydney with clean wholesome foods and to Lilli, Lauren and Emma for their work on the day.

A Request and an offer
If you have not yet liked my facebook page please would you? I am out to spread news of great whole food, whole food ingredients and of course my latest wholefood cooking class program
For new FB Likes this month, I will email you a delicious recipe. Just email me your preference for pumpkin, walnuts or chestnuts, or that you like them all? I will send you back the recipe that reflects your choice.
These ingredients grow together and certainly go together deliciously. Pumpkins below, fit for several feasts, well grown by my friends Antonio and Camilla who run Olive Green Organics. Chestnuts and walnuts collected by me at the beautiful Kookatonga Nut Farm in Mt Irvine in the Blue Mountains.
Put a trip there in your diary for next March.

Live probiotic foods, simple to make lively and lovely to drink and eat

“Bacteria are not germs, but the germinators – and fabric – of all life on earth… In declaring war on them we declared war on the underlying living structure of the planet – on all life-forms we can see – on ourselves”– Stephen Harrod Buhner The Lost Language of Plants


Lacto fermented foods are extraordinary and they have the power to restore to us rude health! These live life enhancing foods and drinks foods have been a passion of mine for many years now. My interest in Macrobiotic philosophy and food led me to start fermenting things back when I was just 14 years old! That’s a good long relationship with good bugs. My first cultures were Japanese Takuan radish pickles that stank and jars of miso and then there was a dairy kefir ‘plant’ I got from my cousin Greg. He christened his S.C.O.B.Y, that’s a Symbiotic Collection Of Bacteria and Yeasts ‘Jim’ he gave me what became and still is known to me ‘son of Jim’. Along the way, there have been intense periods of regular contact and periods when son of Jim has spent time dormant, in the freezer. When I am culturing using son of Jim I get a fresh, drinking style yoghurt that provides a wide range of beneficial probiotic bacteria and yeasts and I can also use him to turn sweet coconut water into a refreshing effervescent mineral rich drink. I can use the dairy kefir product as a drink or turn it into fresh cheese and even a very delicious all raw, all food cheesecake! I now grow a range of scobys, I have a Kombucha ‘mother’ which thrives on green, black red and or white tea and raw sugar, water kefir which produces a fabulous sparkling gingery drop. With these helpers at home I always have the makings of other fermented foods, using the product itself or by utilising whey from my dairy scoby. These can be used to make, amongst many other things, digestible nutritious deliciously light pancakes, pikelets, muffins and fruit compotes and vegetable pickles and by employing their probiotic powers they can be used to turn otherwise hard to digest foods into faster cooking,digestible nourishment.
There is something quite magical about vegetable pickles where you take a fresh ingredient and turn it into what equates to medicinal food; using naught but itself and a little salt.
I am including an article I wrote for Notebook magazine it might be of interest and could encourage you to get friendly with fermented foods. This month I have 2 classes I call ‘Capturing Cultures, get the good bugs’ where these foods can be seen and tasted and you learn the what, why and how of growing them safely and inexpensively at home.
Read my article on Probiotcs, written for Notebook magazine

Sourdough fruit Cake, naturally sweet and a great keeper

Our Sourdough christmas cake is still on offer, with tea of course, to welcome in this new year. May yours be as deliciously, naturally sweet and nutty. I am currently unlaxing in Northern NSW, home of the macadamia, it’s beyond beautiful here, the perfect place to rest and remember the value of time alone. Yesterday I walked through rainforest to a secluded beach a few bays from Byron, but with 5 people to Byron’s 5000! On the way I ate a fabulous breakfast at Harvest a charming cafe  offering excellent local produce made with care. All the  staff  were unusually committed to offering fantastic service; with warm smiles, this is not common in these relaxed, hippy environs. Harvest is at the site of the old Newrybar bakery, which was once run by my friend and sourdough baking teacher John Downes. I made my sourdough leaven in his class in 1983 and I share it with all who come to my baking classes; it makes extraordinarily fine fare. I have some dates to finalise before posting my next term of Sydney classes, apologies to those who are keen to make bookings. I am teaching a two day Sourdough Bread, Pastry, Biscuits and Cake Baking Workshop in Brisbane at Mondo Organics March 24th and 25th, bookings via their site. If you have friends or associates in Queensland who might like to come to this class, please help me spread the word. What whole food cooking classes and workshops would you like this year? I will be teaching in Sydney, Brisbane, Melbourne and Perth and I am hatching a plan to be teaching classes in the UK mid year. I have added a Like me on facebook button, Like away please!

Lacto fermented vegetables and a recipe for Red cabbage, lemon and ginger pickles


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please respect Copyright Holly Davis, these notes and recipe are for personal use only

Why might you make and eat lacto fermented foods?

The lactic acid produced by the lactobacilli preserves the vegetables or fruits and increases their digestibility. This also puts beneficial microorganisms in the digestive tract, which promotes the growth of healthy digestive flora throughout the intestine. This aids digestion and the absorption of other nutrients.

The fermentation process can increase the vitamin levels by as much as 100 times!

Useful enzymes are produced in this process.

Antibiotic and anticarcinogen substances may also be created.

Eating a little fermented food with every meal can aid digestion, particularly of fats.

Eating lacto fermented foods can also reduce the desire for refined sugars.

Oh and they taste fabulous and are a great meal enhancer!

Here is the basic recipe to lacto ferment vegetables

There are many variables when making these foods, always begin with the best quality freshest foods and avoid contaminants.

To make a batch of pickles you will need:

A good board and very sharp knife and / or a food processor with vegetable chopping attachments

Sterile glass jars with airtight lids.

Fresh vegetables clean and dry, chop according to your preference. Root vegetables and cabbages are ideal but softer veg can also pickle well.

Celtic Sea salt approximately 1% of total weight of the vegetables. (If you prefer not to use any salt make sure you add the whey or culture. The presence of the salt prevents putrefying bacteria growing while the beneficial bacteria increase their numbers) personally I prefer the flavour with salt.

Lemon zest is a favourite addition of mine, finely sliced

Spices of your choosing (optional) i.e.chilli, cumin, coriander, fennel seeds.

Home made whey, to introduce lacto bacillus more consistently and rapidly.

Or

Plantarum bacteria culture (‘Culture’ is available from Donna Gates Body Ecology Stockists online at www.bodyecology.com )

Or my preferred method : With no addition of a culture, allowing for the capture of organisms present in your kitchen. Often this works well and occasionally you might lose a batch due to having caught some putrefying bacteria. (You will know if this has happened because your pickle will smell awful and possibly also have become slimy, there is no danger you will want to try them!)

Lacto fermented vegetables can be kept many months when stored correctly and in a cool dark place.

Red Cabbage lemon and ginger pickles

Copyright Holly Davis

1 large fresh organic red cabbage, sliced finely

1 knob organic ginger, grated

1 organic lemon, zest only

Sea salt (1% of total weight of cabbage)

Chop the vegetables

Add the salt and rub in a loving but vigorous manner; until the cabbage has released plenty of liquid

Mix very well with the other ingredients

Contain completely covered in liquid in sterile glass jars, push vegetables down firmly so they are tightly packed and covered in their own juices

Ensure there is a good 5cms between the top of the vegetables and liquid and the lid of the jar as they expand a little during fermentation.

Lid tightly and leave on the kitchen bench 4-7 days depending on the weather. 18-20˚C is ideal (fermentation takes longer when the weather is cold)

The mix will bubble and if you were to open it, it would smell rather unpleasant for the first few days, don’t open the jars now as the process is anaerobic and oxygen at this stage may cause them to spoil. With red cabbage you will notice it turn from purple to bright pink, this is due to the action of the acid produced by the lacto bacteria.

On about day 5 you can place the pickles in the fridge and store there as you use them. Be sure to use only spotless utensils so you dont contaminate the mix.

The flavours continue to develop over several months but these can be eaten any time after the fermentation process has completed, say around 5 days

Note re something course participants are often confused by: Lacto bacillus are not dairy food; though they grow happily in milk products. Lactose is the sugar in dairy food it is not present in lacto fermented vegetables unless you add a dairy product such as whey.


Summer in Australia is bejewelled with cherries. Christmas cake, upcoming classes, Christmas catering and probiotic cultures

Naturally leavened Christmas cake in the making, one for tomorrows class and one for the pantry.

If you are keen and very quick, there is a place in my Sourdough baking, including cake class tomorrow November 6th. The class is being held in a private home, an intimate event with only 6 participants and lots of time to get your baking questions answered. It runs from 11-4 at Coaster retreat, access is by ferry from Palm Beach wharf, give me a call if you are interested to join us. I ran this class while in Perth last and it was a massive success. Using a natural sourdough leaven and slow fermentation ensures that the delicious sweetness of organic fruit is supported by the most digestible organic flour. My Chistmas cake gets its light, moist texture and rich flavour from the addition of Coopers stout and a little unpasteurised white miso!

The November 9th class, Quick Spring Delights; wholefood meals in 20 minutes is full to bursting. Jude Blereau was just here in Sydney, lucky us, she coined this The Little Black Dress Class!– Due to the rush of interest Michele and I  have opened a new date for this same class on Wednesday November 30th from 11am-3pm, cost $125. Michele’s Balmoral address is provided after booking. Places are already being snapped up so if your interested or know someone who might be, please contact michele@ahealthyview.com.au at your earliest convenience.

Christmas Catering I have already taken a few bookings for Catering jobs leading up to Christmas. You might like to consider having me cook you a range of delicious wholefood canastables for stocking your festive fridge. If you are planning events prior to December 20th or during January please be in touch soon, to assist me in planning and to avoid disappointment. Here are a few ideas for the sorts of things that keep well, which I could deliver to you to make your Christmas delicious and a little easier. Beluga lentil salad with assorted mushrooms, Gravlax King fish (a more sustainable and healthier option than farmed salmon), Organic Mushroom and chicken liver pate, Organic cucumber, ginger and mint salad, Star anise and ginger roasted organic pork neck for slicing cold, Mirin and vanilla poached organic summer fruits, Gin and orange pickled organic cherries-these are fantastic with cold meats or summer fish dishes, Cultured organic red cabbage pickles, Organic Kim chi pickles, and of course an organic Chrissy cake and so much more… The price for such home delivered treats? The food costs plus $70 an hour to shop, cook and depending on your location, to deliver.

I have Probiotic cultures and cultured vegetables for sale too, these are fabulous to have on hand to prepare your digestive system for the festive times ahead and to aid recovery afterwards. I have Kombucha, dairy kefir and water kefir SCOBy’s, to give away if you come to Palm Beach or for sale when posted to you. I charge $25 for one $35 for two or more; they come with instructions for maintaing them. I also make and sell a range of cultured vegetables which make a fabulous addition to many meals, these valuable foods help to reduce sugar cravings whilst also supplying vast amounts of beneficial bacteria, vitamins and live enzymes. Red cabbage, lemon and ginger is a favourite of mine. I will post the basic recipe for making your own soon. Many people who have not been to a Capturing Cultures Class, and actually also many who have,  prefer to buy these pickles; rather than make their own. The cost when collected is $25 per 750 mls glass jar or $40 per 2 litre glass jar. It isn’t difficult to make these pickles but many folk fear the B word!

Lightness of being and stunning light itself makes Spring into Summer a glorious time. Enjoy every moment…

Coasting through winter with food and friendship

Winter on Pittwater is beyond glorious. We spent a lovely sunny day with our  friend Lucienne and her generous mother Cherie at Cherie’s home in the bush. It is a short ferry ride from our home to hers but it feels like a world away, no cars to be seen or heard in this stunning, boat access only, bay. It was a day of shared cooking, festivating and feasting together with visits from unexpected and opportunistic diners and tea drinking friends. A day that reminded us all of the pleasure it is to be alive and able to share our selves. It certainly helped that Cherie’s home is exquisite and that every direction you look your eyes are met with beauty, be it a tray of sparklingly clean glasses, a wall of fine art, her Chinese red leather chair or beautifully framed outlooks onto nature, days like these make me very grateful for life and loved ones.

A native Firewheel tree provided these spectacular flowers and since the bush abounds with ravenous wallabies, possums, bush rats and goanna  fruiting shrubs must be contained; hence the beautiful bird cages. Below are a few of Cherie’s beautiful botanic watercolours and her colourful palette.

Lucienne and I took to the kitchen and while she made silky linguine India and I made side dishes. Together we cooked cockles and muscles alive alivo and the meal was delightfully shared.

   

This insistent goanna muscled in too and caused a fair bit of  a stir before the sun began to sink and it was time to pack up, return the shells to the water and take tea on the deck and a boat ride home.

Coq au vin recipe

Photo © Cloudy Rhodes

A maturing free ranging cockerel offers deeper flavour and a coarser texture than a hen, it makes for a superb flavoursome meal. Cook in plenty of good stock for extra flavour and sound nutrition. The acidity of the wine also helps to soften the meat and sinews while the low temperature and a long time cooking ensure the meat is not too dry or tough. I like to cook this dish in a roomy enamelled casserole pot, it makes the perfect stove to table ‘one pot’ winter meal. A ceramic (lead free) slow cooker is another option.

3 tablespoons ghee or duck fat

1 truly free range cockerel, rinsed and well dried inside and out

12 eschalots, peeled

1 head purple, new seasons garlic, peeled

4 carrots, in bite size wedges

1 fennel cut in wedges

1 cob of corn kernels (optional)

1 large leek, cut in medium dice and then well washed

10 white peppercorns

½ bunch thyme

½ bunch flat leaf parsley

2 bay leaves

1 bottle of biodynamic shiraz

1.5 litres gelatinous chicken stock (check seasoning before adding salts)

Sea salt and or fish sauce, to taste, this dish cooks a long time and the liquids reduce so don’t over season at the start, adjust towards the end

Add lots of freshly chopped thyme and flat leaf parsley at the end of cooking

Heat the cooking pot and add the fat

Sauté  the eshallots until they are starting to brown all over

Add the garlic and cook for 2 minutes

Turn these into a bowl and set aside, put the pot back on the stove

Brown and seal the cockerel then sit it breast bone up

Add back the eschallots and garlic and the remaining ingredients

Bring to a gentle simmer

Turn the heat down, place a lid on the pot and simmer very gently for 2-2½ hrs

The meat will be falling from the bones

Remove and discard the cooked herbs and add the fresh

Serve with plenty of the cooking liquor, barely wilted greens and boiled kipfler potatoes,

naturally fermented (cultured) vegetables and a glass of delicious red wine

Give thanks for the bird that feeds you so well

COPYRIGHT © HOLLY DAVIS

NURTURING  NOURISHING  DELECTABLE  WHOLEFOOD

NURTURING  NOURISHING
DELECTABLE  WHOLEFOOD